Image: Ruth Eckland

Concept:

The exhibition explores what it is to lose something, someone, some direction and some sense of self. But is it so bad to be a flaneur, flaneuse, in wanderlust, in terra incognita, a nomad, a shaman, a drifter?

A fantastic array of international artists come together in one space to find lucidity in that loss. Through various retrieval methodologies the artists explore navigational strategies, emotional celibacy, memories, reinvention, survival skills and escapism. Work exhibited include film, animation, photography, installations, drawings, paintings and sculpture to keep hold of old ties, retrace steps and to experience the joy of retrieval.

The exhibition asks the audience how we find clarity and closure when the subject has ceased. It allows the artists to answer how the unforeseen is evitable not calculated or measured because ultimately our possessions may have disappeared but we are still here.


Image: Ellen Jantzen

Tony Bowen


Brighton, UK

'Scratch'


2268 HMP Holloway – Affections
6199 Kemptown - Claire Forever
5952 Eastbourne – Regret
6249 Wanstead Flats – Rumour

(30cm x 30cm (framed to 52cm x 52cm); Colour Photographic Pigment Print on Archival Baryta Paper)

These photographs examine found glass surfaces between London and Sussex (usually street furniture), Gradual narratives emerge, combining natural marks and deliberate interventions, leaving atmospheric echoes of what each space has witnessed. Touching traces of ‘being human’ are occasionally evident, especially of affection, love, loss and hurt. These traces trigger a forensic curiosity, provoking the imagination in unexpected ways.

'Fadings'

Fadings: Untitled 2
Fadings: Untitled 5
Fadings: Untitled 6
Fadings: Untitled 10 

(20cm x 20cm (framed to 40cm x 40cm); Black and White Photographic Pigment Print on Archival Baryta Paper)

These photographs examine the surface of the ground following the annual 'Pride' event in Brighton. As a temporary 'citadel' is built, the ground in parts is crushed before 80,000 people celebrate tolerance and diversity in all its forms. Suddenly, the party's over and everything 'disappears'. Suffocated grass, its complexion transformed, vividly delineates a surreal topography of absence and loss. The healing process begins, the ground gradually consumes evidence that anything ever happened and memories begin to decay.